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Englisch LK Niedersachsen 2007- A m e r i c a
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_=-LiSa-=_
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BeitragVerfasst am: 03 Apr 2007 - 17:49:58    Titel: Englisch LK Niedersachsen 2007- A m e r i c a

Hey ho

...immernoch mit der Hoffnung, eine Lösung für das Durcheinander zu finden..

Alles Englische zum Thema American Identities

• The Making of ‘Americans’ ( e. g. extract from Crèvecoeur’s 3rd letter “What is an American?“)

• American Landmarks and Icons: The Declaration of Independence (opening part), the Flag of the United States/the Pledge of Allegiance, the Statue of Liberty

• Mainstream American Values (e. g. individualism, egalitarianism, success)

• Ethnic and Social Diversity: sorrows, hopes, careers (e. g. selected interviews by Studs Terkel)

T. C. Boyle, The Tortilla Curtain




hier her


Freu mich auf die nächste Diskussion Wink

Greetz
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BeitragVerfasst am: 03 Apr 2007 - 18:03:04    Titel:

Etwas über das heissgeliebte Thema American Dream


The American Dream
(James Truslow Adams!! The Epic of America 1930).

- is the faith held by many in the USA, the land of freedom, that through hard work, courage, and determination one can achieve a better life for oneself, usually through financial prosperity.

- Main point also part of the Declaration of Independence: Pursuit of happiness
- Origin: pilgrim fathers: Escape from religious and material oppression
- Their ethic concept: to work hard for achieving a better and prosper life and every person has the chance for that.
- No exact definition: based on dreams and wishes of each individual
- Striving features of the induvidual, personal level: moral integrity, fairnesse, honesty, hard-working, frugality, perseverance (Ausdauer)
- National level: should concentrate on social order, which enables each citizen to realize his entire potential, independent of social, economic and ethnic backgrounds.

The American dream, along with escape from persecution or war in one's home country, has always been the primary reason for immigrants wanting to come to America

Whereas past generations of immigrants tended to come from Europe, a majority of contemporary immigrants hail from Latin America and Asia.

In the 20th century, the American Dream had its challenges. The Great Depression caused widespread hardship during the Thirties, and was almost a reverse of the dream for those directly affected. Racial instability did not disappear, and in some parts of the country racial violence was almost commonplace. There was concern about the undemocratic campaign known as McCarthyism carried on against suspected Communists.

In the 1990s, the pursuit of the American Dream could be seen in the Dot-com boom. People in U.S., as well as the world poured their energy into the new Gold Rush - the Internet. It was again driven by the same faith that by one's ingenuity and hardwork, anyone can become successful in America. Ordinary people started new companies from their garages and became millionaires. This new chapter of the American Dream again became the beacon to the world and attracted many entrepreneurial people from China and India to Silicon Valley to form startups, and seek fortune in America.


The main criticism is that the American Dream is misleading. These critics say that, for various reasons, it simply is not possible for everyone to become prosperous through determination and hard work alone. The consequences of this belief can include the poor feeling that it is their fault that they are not successful. It can also result in less effort towards helping the poor since their poverty is seen as "proof" of their laziness. The concept of the American Dream also ignores other factors of success such as luck, family, language, and wealth one is born into

In the U.S. it was sometimes more difficult for children of poor families to attend college; not attending college set upper limits on their career success, and it is difficult to earn a bachelors' degree — necessary for many fields — in one's free time once one begins working full-time.
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BeitragVerfasst am: 03 Apr 2007 - 18:24:52    Titel:

Hi Lisa,
das ist echt mal ne gute Idee mit den 2 Threads.
Vielen Dank über die Infos zum American Dream.
Sunny
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BeitragVerfasst am: 03 Apr 2007 - 19:12:32    Titel:

Hier was kurzes zur Social Structure in the USA:

Immigration
Social structure of the US has been formed over the centuries by the many diverse groups of immigrants who chose to make America their hime. Additionally there are the people who where already there when the first immigrants arrived (Native Americans) and those whose presence in the country was not voluntary (i.e. the Black Africans who were shipped in to work as slaves)
In the 21st century America is still a popular destination for immigrants who dream of a better life

The melting pot


This term hast ofen been used to describe the assimilation of immigrants into American Life. Its literal meaning is a chemical one: several elements are melted together to form a new product. The idea was that immigrants would fuse togehter with the "old" American nation. The motto "e pluribus unum" (from many to one) which still appears on American coins today, has been used since 1782, reflecting how even the early American saw their country.

However, immigrants like to maintain a sense of their own culutral identity. New theories to express this -> salad bowl, the idea being that many seperate parts make up a whole, while still keeping their individuality.

Important immigration policies
For most of the 19th century when the US was a relatively new and empty country, immigration was unlimited. People were encouraged (by cheap ship passages and the promise of a prosperous new life) to come and settle; this had the added bonu of consolidating the country's position as a nation in its own right after it gained independence from Britain. However, frim the end of the 19th century immigration laws were revised, often in order to exclude certain racial groups.

Native Americans
Driven away from their lands by European settlers. Forced to live on reservation --> large parts were taken frim them. Numbers fell due to European diseases, war and social deprivation. Won the right to govern their own reservations and maintain their culture after many years of treaties, court cases and open resistance.

Hispanics
Largest immigrant group. Often seen as cheap labour and live in deprived conditions (especially Mexicans)
Many find assimilation difficult.

Dann steht hier noch was über Civil War und Civil Rights Movements, aber das is mir jezz zu viel
Wink
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BeitragVerfasst am: 03 Apr 2007 - 20:01:33    Titel:

"What is an American"

In 1782 Jean de Crèvecoeur published Letters from an American Farmer in which he defined an American as a "descendent of Europeans" who, if he were "honest, sober and industrious," prospered in a welcoming land of opportunity which gave him choice of occupation and residence.

Mehr über Crèvecoeur's Definition "What is an American"

http://xroads.virginia.edu/~HYPER/CREV/letter03.html
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BeitragVerfasst am: 04 Apr 2007 - 16:43:18    Titel:

"The Declaration of Independence"

Wanting to be detached from Great Britain, the Americans signed the Declaration of Independence in the year 1776.
Main reasons for this declaration were the will to have the same rights like every independent state und to be absolved fron the British Crown. The intention of the Americans was to break off all political connections between America and Great Britain, because that was the condition to become a free and independent state.

Elements of the "American Dream" and the ideas/notions of America

-democratic country
-(religous) freedom
-equality
-open for everyone
-protected by God (bekanntlich sehr wichtig für die Amerikaner... Wink )
-if you work hard and put enough effort in it, you can achieve a prosperous life with a safe job
-> possible for anyone

"Pledge of Allegiance"/Flag of the U.S.A.


Promise to be faithful,loyal and true to the emblem that represents all 50 states, each of them individual and individually represented on the flag. Pledge to be loyal to the Government, a form of government where the people are sovereign. The 50 states are united as a single Republic under the Divine providence of God. They can not be seperated. The people of the Nation being afforded the freedom to pursue life,liberty and happiness. Each person is entitled to be treated justly, fairly and according to proper law and principles, which go for every American, regardless of race, religion, color or creed. Like the 50 states, the millions of people can not be seperated or divided.

Sooo,das reicht mir erstmal mit den Ammis...so genau wird das eh nicht erwartet denk ich, hauptsache man hat mal was von den ganzen Sachen gehört und kann notfalls ein bisschen was drüber erzählen Wink
Viel Spaß weiterhin...
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BeitragVerfasst am: 04 Apr 2007 - 17:47:27    Titel:

Danke dafür Smile

Zu "Pledge of Allegiance"/Flag of the U.S.A. hab ich auch grad im Internet was gesucht
Aber dann brauch ich das ja net mehr reinstellen Wink

LG
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BeitragVerfasst am: 04 Apr 2007 - 18:16:25    Titel:

Bin grad das Forum am Durchforsten, suche zwar nach ganz anderen Sachen, finde aber immer mehr zu Englisch:

In diesem Thread (http://www.uni-protokolle.de/foren/viewtopic.php?p=920037#920037) hat schon mal jemand versucht sowas ähnliches wie ich aufzubauen, ne Art Sammlung aller Schwerpunktthemen. Wurde allerdings nie weitergeführt, ich kopier den einen Beitrag zum Thema American Identities mal eben hier rein:


What is an American?



- An American is anyone who loves life enough to want the best that it has to offer.
-Americans are not automatically satisfied with their current situation.
- A self-image especially the American is a dynamic , not a static development of social structures.
- Americans look to more than the next meal; they look to the future, the long term, a better tomorrow.
~~~~> They are about to build a solid social status to offer the best start in life for their children.
- An American is anyone who understands that to achieve the best in life requires action, exertion, effort. Americans aren't idyll daydreamers; they take the initiative.
-Immigrants have no assurance of success in a new land with different habits, institutions and language.
- The American Dream; The equality in opportunities causes not only success but many are also able to fall.
-The Declaration states that all men are endowed "with certain unalienable rights, that among these are life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness."
- An American is generous. Americans have helped out just about every other nation in the world in their time of need. (at least they think so )
- In America, individuals of all nations are melted into a new race of men, whose labours and posterity will one day cause great changes in the world
- No man has to bow. No man born to royalty. Here we judge you by what you do, not by what your father was.
- Americans are defined in love of liberty, the pursuit of justice, the urge to invent, the desire for wealth, the drive to explore (spirit of frontier) , the quest for spiritual values.


Reference to history :


- The 17th-century Puritan leader Cotton Mather is the spiritual ancestor of today's vogue for political correctness, which Professor Allitt
sees as a secular transfiguration of the Puritan belief that you can think, do, and say the right things and gradually get rid of the wrong things."

Danke hier an KirkOmelette

LG
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BeitragVerfasst am: 04 Apr 2007 - 18:27:27    Titel:

America: Vision of a New World:

The Mayflower Compact was the first governing document of Plymouth Colony. It was drafted by the Puritan pilgrims who crossed the Atlantic aboard the Mayflower. It was signed on November 11, 1620 in what is now Provincetown Harbor near Cape Cod. Having settled at Plymouth (thus named by Captain John Smith earlier), the pilgrims recognized that their land was outside the chartered territory of the London Company. Thus, the Mayflower Compact was signed to establish a civil government based upon a majoritarian model and to proclaim the settlers' allegiance to the king. The compact was referred to by John Adams as the foundation of the Constitution of the United States, but he was speaking figuratively, not literally.
The settlers were well aware that earlier settlements in the New World had failed due to a lack of central leadership, and the Mayflower Compact was essentially a social contract in which the settlers agreed to abide by the rules of the government for the sake of their own survival. The government, in return, would derive its power from the consent of the governed.

The Declaration of Independence is the document in which the Thirteen Colonies in North America declared themselves independent of the Kingdom of Great Britain and explained their justifications for doing so. It was ratified by the Continental Congress on July 4, 1776. This anniversary is celebrated as Independence Day in the United States. The handwritten copy signed by the delegates to the Congress is on display in the National Archives in Washington, D.C.
Background:
Throughout the 1750 and 1760s, relations between Great Britain and thirteen of her North American colonies had become increasingly strained. Fighting broke out in 1775 at Lexington and Concord marking the beginning of the American Revolutionary War. Although there was little initial sentiment for outright independence, the view of the British as oppressors widened after the passage of the Intolerable Acts, which struck strongly against Colonial self-rule. The rising tide against British rule was exemplified and strengthened by works such as Thomas Paine's pamphlet Common Sense, released on January 10, 1776, which had a substantial impact on the hearts and minds of colonial Americans.

Manifest Destiny
is a phrase that expressed the belief that the United States had a divinely inspired mission to expand, spreading its form of democracy and freedom. Advocates of Manifest Destiny believed that expansion was not only good, but that it was obvious ("manifest") and inevitable ("destiny"). Originally a political catch phrase of the 19th century, Manifest Destiny eventually became a standard historical term, often used as a synonym for the territorial expansion of the United States across North America towards the Pacific Ocean.
Manifest Destiny was always a general notion rather than a specific policy. The term combined a belief in expansionism with other popular ideas of the era, including American exceptionalism, Romantic nationalism, and a belief in the natural superiority of what was then called the "Anglo-Saxon race". While many writers focus primarily upon American expansionism when discussing Manifest Destiny, others see in the term a broader expression of a belief in America's "mission" in the world, which has meant different things to different people over the years.

Immigration: Opportunities and Problems

The United States has a long history of immigration, from 1600 to the present. Millions came from Europe in the 19th century, from Asia, Africa, and Latin America in the present day. Throughout American history, immigration has caused controversy regarding the political loyalties and values of people who have moved from one nation to another. The British settlers of the colonial era moved from one part of the British Empire to another (as did the Dutch), and did not change their nation, but the Germans did and nearly everyone else did so. Given the geography, most immigrants came long distances. However the French Canadians who came down from Quebec after 1860, and the Mexicans who came north after 1911, found it easy to move back and forth. Indeed with cheap jet travel after 1965, a return to the country of origin became fast and fairly inexpensive.
With proposals to criminalise illegal and undocumented immigrants and to build a wall along the 2,000 mile border between the US and Mexico in early 2006 the country saw itself immersed in a debate at the end of March and beginning of April about these laws and the role of immigration post 9/11.

The melting pot
is a metaphor for the way in which homogenous societies develop, in which the ingredients in the pot (people of different cultures and religions) are combined so as to lose their discrete identities and yield a final product of uniform consistency and flavor, which is quite different from the original inputs. This process is also known as cultural assimilation.
However, this does not show the reality in the USA. Today immigrants do not assimilate as easily as the settlers from Europe, but form their own societies within American society. Besides, not even all Americans melt into one homogeneous society, since it is greatly split up due to factors like wealth and the resulting class divisions for instance.
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BeitragVerfasst am: 04 Apr 2007 - 20:25:55    Titel:

Grad gefunden: http://www.uni-protokolle.de/foren/viewt/123389,0.html

Da wurde das mit Studs Terkel auch schon ein bisschen disskutiert

@Sunny: ehrlich gesagt lern ich gar nich so viel für Englisch bzw hab ich nich. Ich such mir das meistens nur raus, les das einmal kurz, habs aber auch meistens wieder schnell vergessen. Ich kann mich im Moment überhaupt nicht konzentrieren das irgendwie intensiv durchzuziehen.

Bräuchte auch noch auf jeden Fall mehr Tipps zu "language" und so. Zählt ja mehr im Abi.
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