Studium, Ausbildung und Beruf
 StudiumHome   FAQFAQ   RegelnRegeln   SuchenSuchen    RegistrierenRegistrieren   LoginLogin

Übersetzung
Neues Thema eröffnen   Neue Antwort erstellen
Foren-Übersicht -> Englisch-Forum -> Übersetzung
 
Autor Nachricht
qeen324
Newbie
Benutzer-Profile anzeigen
Newbie


Anmeldungsdatum: 29.08.2009
Beiträge: 15
Wohnort: Hannover

BeitragVerfasst am: 16 Nov 2009 - 19:25:40    Titel: Übersetzung

Kann mir jemand bitte diesen text übersetzten ich kann es irgendwie nicht ich könnte es nur wortwörtlich aber nach den sinn nach nicht! wäre echt lieb danke ich meine wer gut englisch kann für den wird es wohl kein Problem darstellen danke. Wink

Eveline
by James joyce

SHE sat at the window watching the evening invade the avenue. Her head was leaned against the window curtains and in her nostrils was the odour of dusty cretonne. She was tired.

Few people passed. The man out of the last house passed on his way home; she heard his footsteps clacking along the concrete pavement and afterwards crunching on the cinder path before the new red houses. One time there used to be a field there in which they used to play every evening with other people's children. Then a man from Belfast bought the field and built houses in it -- not like their little brown houses but bright brick houses with shining roofs. The children of the avenue used to play together in that field -- the Devines, the Waters, the Dunns, little Keogh the cripple, she and her brothers and sisters. Ernest, however, never played: he was too grown up. Her father used often to hunt them in out of the field with his blackthorn stick; but usually little Keogh used to keep nix and call out when he saw her father coming. Still they seemed to have been rather happy then. Her father was not so bad then; and besides, her mother was alive. That was a long time ago; she and her brothers and sisters were all grown up her mother was dead. Tizzie Dunn was dead, too, and the Waters had gone back to England. Everything changes. Now she was going to go away like the others, to leave her home.

Home! She looked round the room, reviewing all its familiar objects which she had dusted once a week for so many years, wondering where on earth all the dust came from. Perhaps she would never see again those familiar objects from which she had never dreamed of being divided. And yet during all those years she had never found out the name of the priest whose yellowing photograph hung on the wall above the broken harmonium beside the coloured print of the promises made to Blessed Margaret Mary Alacoque. He had been a school friend of her father. Whenever he showed the photograph to a visitor her father used to pass it with a casual word:

"He is in Melbourne now."

She had consented to go away, to leave her home. Was that wise? She tried to weigh each side of the question. In her home anyway she had shelter and food; she had those whom she had known all her life about her. O course she had to work hard, both in the house and at business. What would they say of her in the Stores when they found out that she had run away with a fellow? Say she was a fool, perhaps; and her place would be filled up by advertisement. Miss Gavan would be glad. She had always had an edge on her, especially whenever there were people listening.

"Miss Hill, don't you see these ladies are waiting?"

"Look lively, Miss Hill, please."

She would not cry many tears at leaving the Stores.

But in her new home, in a distant unknown country, it would not be like that. Then she would be married -- she, Eveline. People would treat her with respect then. She would not be treated as her mother had been. Even now, though she was over nineteen, she sometimes felt herself in danger of her father's violence. She knew it was that that had given her the palpitations. When they were growing up he had never gone for her like he used to go for Harry and Ernest, because she was a girl but latterly he had begun to threaten her and say what he would do to her only for her dead mother's sake. And no she had nobody to protect her. Ernest was dead and Harry, who was in the church decorating business, was nearly always down somewhere in the country. Besides, the invariable squabble for money on Saturday nights had begun to weary her unspeakably. She always gave her entire wages -- seven shillings -- and Harry always sent up what he could but the trouble was to get any money from her father. He said she used to squander the money, that she had no head, that he wasn't going to give her his hard-earned money to throw about the streets, and much more, for he was usually fairly bad on Saturday night. In the end he would give her the money and ask her had she any intention of buying Sunday's dinner. Then she had to rush out as quickly as she could and do her marketing, holding her black leather purse tightly in her hand as she elbowed her way through the crowds and returning home late under her load of provisions. She had hard work to keep the house together and to see that the two young children who had been left to hr charge went to school regularly and got their meals regularly. It was hard work -- a hard life -- but now that she was about to leave it she did not find it a wholly undesirable life.

She was about to explore another life with Frank. Frank was very kind, manly, open-hearted. She was to go away with him by the night-boat to be his wife and to live with him in Buenos Ayres where he had a home waiting for her. How well she remembered the first time she had seen him; he was lodging in a house on the main road where she used to visit. It seemed a few weeks ago. He was standing at the gate, his peaked cap pushed back on his head and his hair tumbled forward over a face of bronze. Then they had come to know each other. He used to meet her outside the Stores every evening and see her home. He took her to see The Bohemian Girl and she felt elated as she sat in an unaccustomed part of the theatre with him. He was awfully fond of music and sang a little. People knew that they were courting and, when he sang about the lass that loves a sailor, she always felt pleasantly confused. He used to call her Poppens out of fun. First of all it had been an excitement for her to have a fellow and then she had begun to like him. He had tales of distant countries. He had started as a deck boy at a pound a month on a ship of the Allan Line going out to Canada. He told her the names of the ships he had been on and the names of the different services. He had sailed through the Straits of Magellan and he told her stories of the terrible Patagonians. He had fallen on his feet in Buenos Ayres, he said, and had come over to the old country just for a holiday. Of course, her father had found out the affair and had forbidden her to have anything to say to him.

"I know these sailor chaps," he said.

One day he had quarrelled with Frank and after that she had to meet her lover secretly.

The evening deepened in the avenue. The white of two letters in her lap grew indistinct. One was to Harry; the other was to her father. Ernest had been her favourite but she liked Harry too. Her father was becoming old lately, she noticed; he would miss her. Sometimes he could be very nice. Not long before, when she had been laid up for a day, he had read her out a ghost story and made toast for her at the fire. Another day, when their mother was alive, they had all gone for a picnic to the Hill of Howth. She remembered her father putting on her mothers bonnet to make the children laugh.

Her time was running out but she continued to sit by the window, leaning her head against the window curtain, inhaling the odour of dusty cretonne. Down far in the avenue she could hear a street organ playing. She knew the air Strange that it should come that very night to remind her of the promise to her mother, her promise to keep the home together as long as she could. She remembered the last night of her mother's illness; she was again in the close dark room at the other side of the hall and outside she heard a melancholy air of Italy. The organ-player had been ordered to go away and given sixpence. She remembered her father strutting back into the sickroom saying:

"Damned Italians! coming over here!"

As she mused the pitiful vision of her mother's life laid its spell on the very quick of her being -- that life of commonplace sacrifices closing in final craziness. She trembled as she heard again her mother's voice saying constantly with foolish insistence:

"Derevaun Seraun! Derevaun Seraun!"

She stood up in a sudden impulse of terror. Escape! She must escape! Frank would save her. He would give her life, perhaps love, too. But she wanted to live. Why should she be unhappy? She had a right to happiness. Frank would take her in his arms, fold her in his arms. He would save her.

She stood among the swaying crowd in the station at the North Wall. He held her hand and she knew that he was speaking to her, saying something about the passage over and over again. The station was full of soldiers with brown baggages. Through the wide doors of the sheds she caught a glimpse of the black mass of the boat, lying in beside the quay wall, with illumined portholes. She answered nothing. She felt her cheek pale and cold and, out of a maze of distress, she prayed to God to direct her, to show her what was her duty. The boat blew a long mournful whistle into the mist. If she went, tomorrow she would be on the sea with Frank, steaming towards Buenos Ayres. Their passage had been booked. Could she still draw back after all he had done for her? Her distress awoke a nausea in her body and she kept moving her lips in silent fervent prayer.

A bell clanged upon her heart. She felt him seize her hand:

"Come!"

All the seas of the world tumbled about her heart. He was drawing her into them: he would drown her. She gripped with both hands at the iron railing.

"Come!"

No! No! No! It was impossible. Her hands clutched the iron in frenzy. Amid the seas she sent a cry of anguish.

"Eveline! Evvy!"

He rushed beyond the barrier and called to her to follow. He was shouted at to go on but he still called to her. She set her white face to him, passive, like a helpless animal. Her eyes gave him no sign of love or farewell or recognition.


hier meine wortwörtlich übersetzung auf deutsch:
Sie saß am Fenster und sah den Abend dringen in die Allee. Ihr Kopf war gegen das Fenster Gardinen und in der Nase lehnte war der Geruch der staubigen Cretonne. Sie war müde.

Nur wenige Menschen weitergegeben. Der Mann aus dem letzten Haus auf dem Weg nach Hause ging, sie hörte seine Schritte Klappern an der Betondecke und danach Knirschen auf der Aschenbahn Weg, bevor das neue rote Häuser. Eine Zeit befand sich dort ein Feld, in dem sie verwendet, um jeden Abend mit den Kindern anderer Leute zu spielen. Dann kam ein Mann aus Belfast kaufte den Acker und Häuser in ihr - und nicht wie ihre kleine braune Häuser aber hell gemauerte Häuser mit glänzenden Dächern. Die Kinder der Straße benutzt, um zusammen in diesem Bereich spielen - die Devines, das Wasser, die Dunns wenig Keogh der Krüppel, sie und ihre Brüder und Schwestern. Ernest, jedoch nie gespielt: er war zu erwachsen. Ihr Vater oft verwendet, um sie in aus dem Feld mit seinem Schlehdorn-Stick zu jagen, aber meist wenig Keogh verwendet, um nix zu halten und zu rufen, wenn er ihren Vater kommen sah. Dennoch schienen sie waren eher glücklich. Ihr Vater war nicht so schlimm, und außerdem, ihre Mutter am Leben war. Das ist lange her, sie und ihre Brüder und Schwestern waren alle erwachsen ihre Mutter tot sei. Tizzie Dunn war auch tot, und die Wasser gegangen war nach England zurück. Alles ändert sich. Nun, sie wollte weg wie die anderen, ihr Heim zu verlassen.

Heim! Sie sah sich im Zimmer, Überprüfung aller seiner vertrauten Gegenstände, die sie bestäubt einmal pro Woche für so viele Jahre und fragte sich, wo auf der Erde alle kamen aus dem Staub. Vielleicht würde sie nie wieder sehen die vertrauten Gegenstände, von denen sie noch nie davon geträumt, unterteilt. Und doch ist in all diesen Jahren hatte sie nie den Namen des Priesters, dessen vergilbten Fotos an der Wand hing über dem gebrochenen Harmonium neben dem farbigen Druck der Versprechungen zu Blessed Margaret Mary Alacoque gefunden. Er hatte ein Schulfreund ihres Vaters gewesen. Wenn er zeigte das Foto, um dem Besucher ihr Vater sie mit einem zwanglosen Wort übergeben:

"Er ist jetzt in Melbourne."

Sie hatte eingewilligt, weg zu gehen, um ihr Heim zu verlassen. War das klug? Sie versuchte, auf jeder Seite der Frage zu wiegen. In ihrer Heimat hatte sie ohnehin Schutz und Nahrung, sie hat denen, die sie schon ihr ganzes Leben über sie bekannt. O Natürlich hatte sie hart daran arbeiten, sowohl im Haus und in den Geschäftsräumen. Was würden sie von ihrem Mitspracherecht bei der Shop, als sie herausfanden, dass sie sich mit einem Kollegen gelaufen? Sagen, sie sei ein Narr, vielleicht, und ihre Stelle würden durch Werbung gefüllt. Miss Gavan würde mich freuen. Sie hatte schon immer einen Vorsprung auf sie, insbesondere dann, wenn es Menschen zuhören.

"Miss Hill, siehst du nicht, diese Damen warten?"

"Schau lebendig, Miss Hill, bitte."

Sie würde nicht weinen viele Tränen beim Verlassen des Shops.

Aber in ihrer neuen Heimat, in einem fernen unbekannten Land wäre es nicht so sein. Dann würde sie verheiratet sein - sie, Eveline. Die Leute würden sie mit Respekt zu behandeln dann. Sie wollte nicht, wie ihre Mutter behandelt worden war. Selbst jetzt, obwohl sie über neunzehn, sie manchmal das Gefühl, sich selbst in Gefahr der Gewalt ihres Vaters. Sie wusste, dass es hatte, dass ihr das Herzklopfen gegeben. Als sie aufwuchsen er nie für sie verschwunden, wie er genutzt, um Harry und Ernest gehen, weil sie ein Mädchen war aber in letzter Zeit hatte er angefangen, sie zu bedrohen und zu sagen, was er tun sie nur wegen ihrer toten Mutter würde. Und niemand hatte sie niemand, sie zu schützen. Ernest war tot, und Harry, der in der Kirche schmücken Geschäft, war fast immer irgendwo auf dem Land. Außerdem hatte die unveränderliche Streit-Leistungs-Verhältnis am Samstagabend zu langweilen unsäglich begonnen. Sie hat immer ihr ganzes Löhne - sieben Schilling - und Harry immer gesendet werden, was er konnte, aber die Mühe war kein Geld von ihrem Vater bekommen. Er sagte, sie verwendet, um das Geld zu verschwenden, dass sie sich keinen Kopf, er hatte nicht vor ihr zu geben sein schwer verdientes Geld, um die Straßen zu werfen, und vieles mehr, denn er war in der Regel ziemlich schlecht am Samstagabend. Am Ende würde er ihr das Geld geben und sie bitten, hatte sie die Absicht, meinen Abendessen am Sonntag. Dann hatte sie zu eilen, so schnell sie konnten, und ihre Vermarktung zu tun, hielt ihr schwarzes Leder Geldbörse fest in der Hand, wie sie ihren Weg durch die Menge drängte und die Rückkehr spät nach Hause unter ihrer Last von Rückstellungen. Sie hatte hart arbeiten, um das Haus zusammen zu halten und zu sehen, dass die beiden kleinen Kindern, war Zeit, um die Ladung hr ging regelmäßig zur Schule und bekamen ihre Mahlzeiten regelmäßig. Es war harte Arbeit - ein hartes Leben - aber jetzt, dass sie im Begriff war, ihn zu verlassen sie nicht finde es absolut unerwünschte Leben.

Sie war etwa zu erforschen ein anderes Leben mit Frank. Frank war sehr freundlich, männlich, offenherzig. Sie war mit ihm durch die Nacht gehen-Boot seine Frau zu werden und mit ihm leben in Buenos Aires, wo er ein Haus auf sie wartete. Wie gut erinnerte sie sich das erste Mal, sie hatte ihn gesehen, er wohnte in einem Haus an der Hauptstraße, wo sie zu besuchen pflegte. Es schien, vor ein paar Wochen. Er stand vor dem Tor, schob die Mütze wieder auf seinen Kopf und sein Haar fiel nach vorne über das Gesicht aus Bronze. Dann waren sie gekommen, um einander kennenzulernen. Er pflegte sie vor dem Shop treffen sich jeden Abend und ihr Haus zu sehen. Er nahm sie um zu sehen, The Bohemian Girl und sie fühlte sich beschwingt, als sie sich in einer ungewohnten Rolle des Theaters mit ihm. Er war furchtbar gern Musik und sang ein wenig. Man wußte, daß sie den Hof waren, und als er sang über das Mädchen, dass ein Seemann liebt, sie immer das Gefühl, angenehm verwirrt. Er pflegte sie Poppens rufen Spaß. Vor allem war es eine Aufregung für sie zu einem Mann haben, und dann hatte sie begonnen, ihn wie wurde. Er hatte Geschichten von fernen Ländern. Er hatte als ein Deck Junge ein Pfund im Monat an einem Schiff der Allan Line Ausgehen in Kanada gestartet. Er erzählte ihr die Namen der Schiffe, die er hatte und die Namen der verschiedenen Dienste wurden. Er hatte segelten durch die Magellanstraße und er erzählte ihr Geschichten von den schrecklichen Patagonier. Er hatte seine Füße in Buenos Aires gefallen, sagte er, und war gekommen, um über die alte Heimat nur für einen Urlaub. Natürlich hatte, ihr Vater habe auf die Affäre und hatte ihr verboten, etwas zu sagen zu ihm haben.

"Ich habe diese Kerle Seemann weiß", sagte er.

Eines Tages hatte er mit Frank stritten und nach, sie habe heimlich mit ihrem Geliebten zu erfüllen.

Der Abend vertieft in der Allee. Der weiße zwei Buchstaben in ihrem Schoß aufgewachsen undeutlich. Ein Schreiben ging an Harry, der andere war zu ihrem Vater. Ernest hatte ihre Favoriten, aber sie mochte Harry zu. Ihr Vater war in letzter Zeit immer alt, bemerkte sie, er würde sie vermissen. Manchmal konnte er sehr nett. Nicht lange vor, wenn sie für einen Tag hatte sich gelegt, hatte er ihr eine Gespenstergeschichte und machte Toast für sie in das Feuer zu lesen. Ein weiterer Tag, als ihre Mutter noch lebte, hatten sie alle für ein Picknick auf dem Hügel von Howth gegangen. Sie erinnerte sich an ihren Vater zog ihren Müttern Motorhaube, die Kinder zum Lachen zu bringen.

Ihre Zeit war knapp, aber sie weiterhin am Fenster sitzen, lehnte den Kopf gegen das Fenster Vorhang, atmete den Geruch der staubigen Cretonne. Down weit in der Allee konnte sie eine Straße Orgelspiel zu hören. Sie kannte die Luft Seltsam, daß es in derselben Nacht kommen sollte, um sie an das Versprechen, ihre Mutter zu erinnern, ihre Versprechen zu halten zusammen nach Hause, solange sie nur konnte. Sie erinnerte sich an die letzte Nacht der Krankheit ihrer Mutter, sie war wieder in der engen dunklen Raum auf der anderen Seite der Halle und draußen hörte sie ein Hauch von Melancholie Italien. Die Orgel-Player bestellt worden fort und angesichts Pence. Sie erinnerte sich an ihren Vater stolzierte zurück in die Krankenzimmer und sagte:

"Verdammte Italiener! Kommt hierher!"

Als sie die erbärmliche Vision des Lebens der Mutter dachte legte seinen Bann über die sehr schnell von ihrem Wesen - das alltägliche Leben der Opfer der Schliessung in endgültigen Wahnsinn. Sie zitterte, als sie hörte ich wieder die Stimme ihrer Mutter sagen ständig mit törichten Beharren:

"Derevaun Seraun! Derevaun Seraun!"

Sie stand in einem plötzlichen Impuls des Terrors. Escape! Sie muss fliehen! Frank würde sie retten. Er würde ihr Leben, vielleicht auch die Liebe. Aber sie wollte leben. Warum sollte sie unglücklich sein? Sie hatte ein Recht auf Glück. Frank würde sie in die Arme nehmen, falten sie in seine Arme. Er würde sie retten.

Sie stand unter den wogenden Menschenmenge in der Station an der Nordwand. Er hielt ihre Hand und sie wußte, daß er sprach zu ihr, sagt etwas über den Übergang immer und immer wieder. Der Bahnhof war voll von Soldaten mit braunen Gepäck. Durch die breiten Türen der Schuppen fing sie einen Einblick in die schwarze Masse des Bootes, liegt gleich neben die Kaimauer mit beleuchteten Bullaugen. Sie antwortete nichts. Sie spürte ihre Wange bleich und kalt, und aus dem Labyrinth der Not, sie betete zu Gott, dass ihr direkt, ihr zu zeigen, was ihre Pflicht ist. Das Boot blies einen langen klagende Pfeifen in den Nebel. Wenn sie gingen, morgen würde sie auf dem Meer mit Frank werden, Dämpfen in Richtung Buenos Aires. Ihre Stelle war ausgebucht. Könnten sie noch mehr zurück, nachdem alles, was er für sie getan hätten? Ihre Not erwachte ein Übelkeit in ihrem Körper und sie hielt die Lippen zu bewegen im stillen Stoßgebet.

Eine Glocke läutete auf ihr Herz. Sie spürte, wie er ihre Hand zu ergreifen:

"Komm!"

Alle Meere der Welt, fiel über ihr Herz. Er zog sie in ihnen, er würde sie zu ertränken. Sie griff mit beiden Händen an dem eisernen Geländer.

"Komm!"

Nein! Nein! Nein! Es war unmöglich. Ihre Hände hielt das Eisen in Raserei. Zwischen den Meeren schickte sie einen Schrei des Schmerzes.

"Eveline! Evvy!"

Er stürzte über die Absperrung und rief ihr zu folgen. Er rief auf zu gehen, aber er noch rief sie an. Sie stellte ihr weißes Gesicht zu ihm, passiv, wie ein hilfloses Tier. Ihre Augen gab ihm keine Zeichen von Liebe und Abschied oder Anerkennung.
Zwanglos
Senior Member
Benutzer-Profile anzeigen
Senior Member


Anmeldungsdatum: 11.10.2006
Beiträge: 2912
Wohnort: Taipeh

BeitragVerfasst am: 20 Nov 2009 - 04:40:25    Titel:

Right, because we're made of free time here :/ I'll glance at the first paragraph, though...

Zitat:
SHE sat at the window watching the evening invade the avenue. Her head was leaned against the window curtains and in her nostrils was the odour of dusty cretonne. She was tired.

Few people passed. The man out of the last house passed on his way home; she heard his footsteps clacking along the concrete pavement and afterwards crunching on the cinder path before the new red houses. One time there used to be a field there in which they used to play every evening with other people's children. Then a man from Belfast bought the field and built houses in it -- not like their little brown houses but bright brick houses with shining roofs. The children of the avenue used to play together in that field -- the Devines, the Waters, the Dunns, little Keogh the cripple, she and her brothers and sisters. Ernest, however, never played: he was too grown up. Her father used often to hunt them in out of the field with his blackthorn stick; but usually little Keogh used to keep nix and call out when he saw her father coming. Still they seemed to have been rather happy then. Her father was not so bad then; and besides, her mother was alive. That was a long time ago; she and her brothers and sisters were all grown up her mother was dead. Tizzie Dunn was dead, too, and the Waters had gone back to England. Everything changes. Now she was going to go away like the others, to leave her home.


Zitat:
Sie saß am Fenster und sah den Abend dringen in die Allee. Ihr Kopf war gegen das Fenster Gardinen und in der Nase lehnte war der Geruch der staubigen Cretonne. Sie war müde.

Nur wenige Menschen weitergegeben.


Few people passed = Few people walked by. ~ 'vorbei laufen' oder so...

Zitat:
Der Mann aus dem letzten Haus auf dem Weg nach Hause ging,


Der Mann aus dem letzten Haus lief vorbei, als er auf dem Weg nach Hause war,...

Zitat:
...sie hörte seine Schritte Klappern an der Betondecke und danach Knirschen auf der Aschenbahn Weg, bevor das neue rote Häuser.


'before the new red houses' bedeutet 'vor den neuen roten Häusern.' Es hat nichts mit Zeit zu tun.

Zitat:
Eine Zeit...


Einmal...

Zitat:
...befand sich dort ein Feld, in dem sie verwendet, um jeden Abend mit den Kindern anderer Leute zu spielen.


Einmal gab es dort ein Feld, worin sie jeden Abend mit den Kindern anderen Leuten spielte.

'used to' hier bedeutet 'verwendet, um' nicht, sondern 'in der Vergangenheit hat sie ... regelmäßig getan'

Zitat:
Dann kam ein Mann aus Belfast, der den Acker kaufte und neue Häuser darin baute - und nicht wie ihre kleine braune Häuser aber hell gemauerte Häuser mit glänzenden Dächern. Die Kinder der Straße benutzt, um zusammen in diesem Bereich spielen - die Devines, die Waters, die Dunns wenig Keogh der Krüppel, sie und ihre Brüder und Schwestern.


used to =/ brauchen

Namen sollst du nicht übersetzen, also Waters bleibt Waters, da 'Water' hier ein Familienname ist.

'...und der kleine Keogh, der Krüppel."
squeezy14
Full Member
Benutzer-Profile anzeigen
Full Member


Anmeldungsdatum: 20.03.2009
Beiträge: 393
Wohnort: Berlin

BeitragVerfasst am: 21 Nov 2009 - 11:21:07    Titel:

It certainly will be not so good as

http://www.suhrkamp.de/buecher/werke_frankfurter_ausgabe_in_sieben_baenden-james_joyce_3386.html

Sie saß am Fenster und sah,wie der Abend in die Allee einzog. Ihr Kopf war gegen die Fenstervorhänge gelehnt, und in ihrer Nase war der Geruch des staubigen Cretonne. Sie war müde.

Ein paar Menschen liefen vorbei..Der Mann aus dem letzten Haus ging vorbei auf seinem Weg nach Hause; sie hörte seine Schritte klappern auf dem Betonpflaster und danach Knirschen auf dem Schlackenweg vor den neuen roten Häusern. Einst befand sich dort ein Feld, auf dem sie jeden Abend mit den Kindern anderer Leute spielte.. Dann kaufte ein Mann aus Belfast (schliesslich) den Acker und baute Häuser darauf. Nicht so, wie ihre kleinen braunen Häuser aber helle Ziegelsteinäuser mit glänzenden Dächern.

Die Kinder der Straße spielten immer zusammen in diesem Feld. - die Devines, die Waters, die Dunns ,little Keogh, der Krüppel, sie und ihre Brüder und Schwestern. Ernest jedoch spielte nie: er war zu erwachsen.
Ihr Vater jagte sie damals oft aus dem Feld mit seinem Stock aus Schwarzdorn.
Aber gewöhnlich hielt little Keogh Ausschau und rief laut, wenn sie ihren Vater kommen sah.
( To keep nix is an old english boarding school term for keeping a lookout.)
Dennoch schienen sie damals ganz glücklich zu sein.
Ihr Vater war gar nicht so schlimm, und zudem war ihre Mutter am Leben.
Doch das war lange her: Sie und ihre Brüder und Schwestern waren mittlerweile alle erwachsen und ihre Mutter war gestorben.. Tizzie Dunn war auch tot, und die Waters waren nach England zurückgegangen. Alles ändert sich. Nun hatte auch sie vor wegzugehen , wie die anderen, ihre Heimat zu verlassen


Zuletzt bearbeitet von squeezy14 am 22 Nov 2009 - 14:55:00, insgesamt 2-mal bearbeitet
squeezy14
Full Member
Benutzer-Profile anzeigen
Full Member


Anmeldungsdatum: 20.03.2009
Beiträge: 393
Wohnort: Berlin

BeitragVerfasst am: 21 Nov 2009 - 12:15:46    Titel:

Fortsetzung:


Zuhause ! Sie schaute sich im Zimmer um, während sie all ihre vertrauten Gegenstände betrachtete, die sie so viele Jahre einmal die Woche abstaubte, wobei sie sich immer fragte, woher zum Teufel der ganze Staub kam.
Vielleicht würde sie diese vertrauten Objekte nie wieder sehen, von denen sie niemals träumte, getrennt zu sein.Und dennoch, während all der Jahre hat sie niemals den Namen des Priesters herausgefunden, dessen vergilbtes Foto über dem kaputten Harmonium hing, neben dem Farbausdruck der Verheißungen an die heilige Margaret Mary Alacoque.
Er war ein Schuldfreund ihres Vaters gewesen.Wenn immer er dieses Foto einem Gast zeigte, pflegte ihr Vater es mit der beiläufigen Bemerkung zu übereichen:
" Er ist jetzt in Melbourne."

Sie hatte eingewilligt, wegzugehen, ihr Zuhause zu verlassen.
War das klug? Sie versuchte, jede Seite der Frage gegeneinander abzuwägen.Zuhause jedenfalls hatte sie Unterkunft und Essen gehabt.
Und sie hatte alle Menschen um sich, die sie zeit ihres Lebens kannte.
Selbstverständlich musste sie hart arbeiten, sowohl im Haus als auch im Geschäft
Was hätten sie über sie in den Läden gesagt, wenn sie
herausfanden,dass sie mit einem Mann ( Typen?) durchgebrannt war?
Etwa, dass sie möglicherweise eine Närrin war, und ihr Platz (?) wäre voll mit Werbung.
Miss Gavan wäre jedenfalls froh.Sie war ihr stets überlegen gewesen, besonders immer dann, wenn Leute da waren, die zuhörten .

"Miss Hill, sehen sie denn nicht, dass diese Damen warten? "

" Machen sie schnell Miss Hill. Bitte."


Zuletzt bearbeitet von squeezy14 am 22 Nov 2009 - 14:58:41, insgesamt einmal bearbeitet
squeezy14
Full Member
Benutzer-Profile anzeigen
Full Member


Anmeldungsdatum: 20.03.2009
Beiträge: 393
Wohnort: Berlin

BeitragVerfasst am: 21 Nov 2009 - 14:13:20    Titel:

Fortsetzung II

Sie würde kene Träne vergiessen,wenn ich den Läden den Rücken kehrte.
Aber in ihrem neuen Zuhause, in einem entfernten unbekannten Land, wäre es nicht so.Sie wäre verheiratet - sie, die Eveline.
Die Leute würden sie dann mit Respekt behandeln.Sie würde nicht behandelt werden, wie ihre Mutter es tat.

Sogar jetzt, obwohl sie über neunzehn war, fühlte sie sich von der Gewalt ihres Vaters bedroht.
Sie wusste, es war das, was ihr stets Herzklopfen bereitete.Während sie heranwuchsen, ging er ihr nie an die Wäsche.so wie er es bei Harry und Ernest tat, weil sie ein Mädchen war.Aber neuerdings hatte er angefangen, sie zu bedrohen und zu sagen, was er alles für sie tun würde, nur um ihrer toten Mutter wegen. Nein, sie hatte niemanden, der sie beschützte.
Ernest war tot, und Harry, der in der Kirchenauststattung tätig war, war fast immer irgendwo landab.

Abgesehen davon begann das ständige Gezänk um Geld für Samstagabend sie unsagbar zu langweilen.
Sie gab ihr immer den Gesamtlohn - sieben Shilling - und Harry schickte immer, was er konnte, aber das Problem war, Geld von ihrem Vater zu bekommen.
Er sagte, sie verschwende ständig das Geld,und dass sie keinen Verstand habe, dass er ihr das hartverdiente Geld nicht geben werde, um es in den Strassen herumzuwerfen, und vieles mehr.Denn Samstag Abend war er gewöhnlich ziemlich schlimm
Letzten Endes gibt er ihr das Geld und fragt sie, ob sie doch die Absicht hätte, das Abendessen für Sonntag einzukaufen.
Dann musste sie hinauseilen so schnell sie konnte und ihre Einkäufe tätigen, ihre schwarze Lederbörse fest in ihrer Hand, während sie sich den Weg durch die Menge bahnte, und spät zurückkam unter ihrer Last von Vorräten.
Sie hatte harte Arbeit, den Haushalt zusammenzuhalten und zu sehen, dass die zwei kleinen Kinder , die unter ihrer Aufsicht zurückblieben, regelmässig zur Schule gingen und regelmässig ihre Mahlzeiten bekamen.
Es war harte Arbeit - ein mühevolles Leben - aber jetzt, da sie dabei war, es hinter sich zu lassen, empfand sie es nicht als ein völlig unwünschenswertes Leben.

Sie war dabei, ein anderes Leben mit Frank zu erforschen Frank war sehr nett, männlich, offenherzig.
Sie hatte vor, mit ihm fortzugehen mit dem Nachtboot, um seine Frau zu sein und mit ihm in Buenos Aires zu leben, wo er ein Haus hatte, das auf sie wartete.
Wie gut erinnerte sie sich an das erste Mal , als sie ihn sah; Er wohnte in einem Haus an der Hauptstrasse, wo sie ihn gewöhnlich besuchte. Es schien ein paar Wochen her. Er stand am Tor. Seine Schirmmütze schob sich auf seinem Kopf nach hinten und seine Haare fielen nach vorn über ein gebräuntes Gesicht. Dann hatten sie sich kennengelernt.

Er traf sie gewöhnlich jeden Abend ausserhalb der Läden und besuchte sie zuhause. Er führte sie aus, The Bohemian Girl zu besuchen, und sie fühlte sich beschwingt, während sie in einer ungewohnten Rolle des Theaters mit ihm saß.
Er war schrecklich angetan von Musik und sang ein wenig.
Die Leute wussten, dass sie miteinander gehen, und wenn er über das Mädchen sang, welches einen Matrosen liebt, fühlte sie sich immer angenehm irritiert.
Er nannte sie gewöhnlich Poppens, aus Jux. ( Poppens : British term of endearment for a child or a swettheart)
qeen324
Newbie
Benutzer-Profile anzeigen
Newbie


Anmeldungsdatum: 29.08.2009
Beiträge: 15
Wohnort: Hannover

BeitragVerfasst am: 22 Nov 2009 - 13:15:40    Titel: Hey ho

Dankeschön für eure sinngemäße übersetzung hat mir echt geholfrn danke nochmal Very Happy also ich verstehe den text jetzte !
Beiträge der letzten Zeit anzeigen:   
Foren-Übersicht -> Englisch-Forum -> Übersetzung
Neues Thema eröffnen   Neue Antwort erstellen Alle Zeiten sind GMT + 1 Stunde
Seite 1 von 1

 
Gehe zu:  
Du kannst keine Beiträge in dieses Forum schreiben.
Du kannst auf Beiträge in diesem Forum nicht antworten.
Du kannst deine Beiträge in diesem Forum nicht bearbeiten.
Du kannst deine Beiträge in diesem Forum nicht löschen.
Du kannst an Umfragen in diesem Forum nicht mitmachen.

Chat :: Nachrichten:: Lexikon :: Bücher :: Impressum