Studium, Ausbildung und Beruf
 StudiumHome   FAQFAQ   RegelnRegeln   SuchenSuchen    RegistrierenRegistrieren   LoginLogin

Daniel Kahnemann - Psychologe und Nobelpreisträger
Gehe zu Seite 1, 2  Weiter
Neues Thema eröffnen   Neue Antwort erstellen
Foren-Übersicht -> Psychologie-Forum -> Daniel Kahnemann - Psychologe und Nobelpreisträger
 
Autor Nachricht
D. Ariely
Full Member
Benutzer-Profile anzeigen
Full Member


Anmeldungsdatum: 13.08.2011
Beiträge: 176

BeitragVerfasst am: 08 Sep 2011 - 10:02:59    Titel: Daniel Kahnemann - Psychologe und Nobelpreisträger

Zitat:
Daniel Kahneman




Daniel Kahneman (hebr. ‏דניאל כהנמן‎; * 5. März 1934 in Tel-Aviv) ist ein israelisch-US-amerikanischer Psychologe, der 2002 zusammen mit Vernon L. Smith den „Wirtschafts-Nobelpreis“ erhielt. Die zugrundeliegende Theorie – die „Prospect Theory“ – entwickelte der Wissenschaftler zusammen mit Amos Tversky. Bekannt wurden vor allem seine Arbeiten zu Urteilsheuristiken und kognitiven Verzerrungen.

Daniel Kahneman wurde 1934 in Tel Aviv geboren. Er studierte Psychologie und Mathematik an der Hebräischen Universität Jerusalem und Psychologie an der University of California. Von 1961 bis 1978 lehrte Kahneman an der Hebrew University und von 1978 bis 1986 an der University of British Columbia; von 1986 bis 1994 war er Professor an der University of California, Berkeley. Er ist verheiratet mit Anne Treisman.

Seit 1993 hat Kahneman die Eugene-Higgins-Professur für Psychologie an der Woodrow Wilson School für öffentliche und internationale Angelegenheiten der Princeton University inne.

Er gewann den Hilgard-Preis für seinen Beitrag zur Allgemeinen Psychologie sowie die Warren-Medaille der Gesellschaft für Experimentalpsychologie
. Steven Pinker nannte Kahneman den „wichtigsten lebenden Psychologen“. Nassim Taleb nannte Kahnemans 2011 erscheinendes Buch Thinking, Fast and Slow als in einer Liga mit Der Wohlstand der Nationen und Die Traumdeutung.


Literatur


* D. Kahneman, A. Tversky (Hrsg.): Choices, Values, and Frames. Cambridge University Press, New York 2000, ISBN 0-521-62749-4.
* D. Kahneman, Paul Slovic, A. Tversky (Hrsg.): Judgment under Uncertainty: Heuristics and Biases. Cambridge University Press, New York 1982, ISBN 0-521-28414-7.
* D. Kahneman, E. Diener, N. Schwarz (Hrsg.): Well-Being: The Foundations of Hedonic Psychology. Russell Sage Found, 2003, ISBN 0-87154-423-7.
* D. Kahneman: Thinking, Fast and Slow. Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2011, ISBN 978-0-374-27563-1.

[/img]
D. Ariely
Full Member
Benutzer-Profile anzeigen
Full Member


Anmeldungsdatum: 13.08.2011
Beiträge: 176

BeitragVerfasst am: 08 Sep 2011 - 10:16:58    Titel:

Zitat:
American Psychological Society OBSERVER
Vol. 15, No. 10, December 2002 (pp. 1)



Why a Psychologist Won the Nobel Prize in Economics


BY ROBERT MACCOUN

University of California, Berkeley

Daniel Kahneman has long been recognized as one of the eminent academic psychologists of the past century. He has already received all the most prestigious awards our profession bestows. He now adds to those honors the distinction of being the first PhD in psychology to receive a Nobel Prize in Economics.

Giving the award to a psychologist is not entirely unprecedented. The 1978 Nobel in Economics went to Herbert Simon, professor of Psychology and Computer Science at Carnegie Mellon, for his groundbreaking work on bounded rationality - an important precursor to Kahneman's own work. But Simon's PhD was in Political Science, not psychology, and his rationality work - unlike his work on artificial intelligence - was much more strongly rooted in economics, political theory and management theory than in academic psychology.

Of course, the main reason so few psychologists have reached Nobel Laureate status is simply that there is no Nobel Prize for psychology
. (Nobel also snubbed mathematics, by the way.) That economists would bestow this scarce resource on an outsider is remarkable; that they would award it to Daniel Kahneman is doubly so, because Kahneman has been openly and relentlessly critical of the very foundations of neo-classical economics since the 1970s. Until quite recently many economists have been fiercely resistant and sometimes openly hostile to Kahneman's work with the late Amos Tversky. The typical arguments: People are rational when the stakes matter; people are rational in the aggregate if not individually; people learn from mistakes in ecologically representative situations; our cognitive strategies must be evolutionarily adaptive or we wouldn't have them. A defensible version of the latter argument was endorsed explicitly by Kahneman and Tversky several decades ago, a fact which recent critics continue to ignore. The other arguments are empirical, and the collective evidence against them is now quite impressive.

But that evidence was also impressive a decade ago, with little apparent effect on economists. In a recent article in Journal of Economic Perspectives, Matthew Rabin and Richard Thaler compared their profession's state of denial to the pet shop proprietor in the Monty Python sketch who refused to refund the sale of a dead Norwegian Blue parrot, insisting it was merely "pining for the fjords." It may be difficult for psychologists to empathize with economists' prolonged resistance to several decades of experimental evidence. Contemporary psychologists hold few bedrock theoretical assumptions, and our core principles are sometimes too supple and flexible to permit direct falsification. Arguably, any smugness we feel at Kahneman's victory should be blended with a large dose of admiration for the explicitness and testability of economic theory.

Many other prominent psychologists have documented cognitive and motivational principles at odds with the "economic actor" caricature. Why is it that Kahneman's work stands out in the eyes of economists? There are three distinctive features of his research program with Tversky. First, almost every one of their papers confronts questions framed in the language (often mathematical) of neo-classical economics. Second, though their discussion sections are rich in cognitive theorizing, their core arguments make only sparing use of hypothetical constructs, focusing instead on functional relationships among observed variables in the tradition of psychophysics. Regardless of whether this promotes better psychology, it certainly facilitates better economics. Finally, Kahneman and Tversky's papers rely less on elaborate experimentation and psychometrics than on simple but powerful demonstrations of replicable phenomena that were "right under our noses" but had previously escaped our collective attention. One can imagine Bentham or Bernoulli or Bayes reading the 1974 and 1984 Science papers with surprised engagement.

An early indication of a thaw in economists' views of Kahneman came in 1998, in a tribute to Tversky and Kahneman's work written by Harvard economists David Laibson and Richard Zeckhauser, soon after Tversky's death. Summarizing the 1972 Science paper on heuristics and biases, and the 1979 Econometrica article on prospect theory, they argued that "these two publications altered the intellectual history of economics." They also note that "folk wisdom holds that 'Prospect theory' is the most cited paper ever published in Econometrica," a claim the Nobel committee confirmed.

The momentum continued in 2000 and 2001. In 2001, the Nobel went to George Akerlof, an economist who had long made use of psychological insights in his work. And economist Matthew Rabin, who has collaborated with Kahneman for many years on a biannual Russell Sage Foundation behavioral economics summer camp, received both a MacArthur "genius" grant and the John Bates Clark Medal in Economics, awarded biennially to the most significant American economist under the age of 40 [Editor's Note: Kahneman, Rabin, and MacCoun participated in John Darley's Presidential Symposium at the 2002 APS Convention]. In 2000, Rabin published in Econometrica what many consider to be the final nail in the coffin for the traditional economic utility calculus as a description of human choice. Rabin proved mathematically that the degree of concavity necessary to explain risk-averse choices in low stakes choices necessarily predicts absurd (and unobserved) levels of risk aversion in higher-stake situations. Rabin noted that prospect theory nicely handled this and other anomalies with relative few additional assumptions.

Though economists are learning to accommodate the reality of cognitive heuristics, loss aversion, and framing effects, it is interesting to note that the Prize committee made no mention of some of Kahneman's more recent work, which poses new and provocative challenges for economic theory and institutional design. Kahneman and his collaborators have demonstrated serious limitations in our ability to map important evaluative judgments - willingness to pay for environmental mitigation, or recommended punitive damage awards - onto a dollar metric. And they have documented the often sizeable disjuncture between our abstract preferences, our actual momentary hedonic experiences, and our subsequent mental representations of those experiences.

In his public addresses, Kahneman is always quick to point out his enormous debt to his many collaborators and close colleagues, especially Amos Tversky, who would surely have shared the Nobel were he alive today. Still, there are few if any living social scientists, of any discipline, who have made contributions on a par with the breadth, depth, and sheer magnitude of Kahneman's scholarly output. His selection for the Nobel Prize shows that, for all its foibles, human judgment sometimes gets it right.


ROBERT MACCOUN is Professor of Public Policy, Professor of Law, and Affiliated Professor of Psychology at the University of California, Berkeley. As a visiting professor at Princeton in 1999, he co-taught a course on Psychology and Public Policy with Kahneman at the Woodrow Wilson School.


http://conium.org/~maccoun/MacCoun_APS_Observer_essay.html
D. Ariely
Full Member
Benutzer-Profile anzeigen
Full Member


Anmeldungsdatum: 13.08.2011
Beiträge: 176

BeitragVerfasst am: 08 Sep 2011 - 10:31:37    Titel:

Zitat:
Die Prospect Theory, im Deutschen auch Neue Erwartungstheorie genannt, wurde 1979 von Daniel Kahneman und Amos Tversky als eine psychologisch realistischere Alternative zu der Erwartungsnutzentheorie vorgestellt. Sie erlaubt die Beschreibung der Entscheidungsfindung in Situationen der Unsicherheit. Dies sind insbesondere Entscheidungen, bei denen unwägbare Risiken bzw. die Eintrittswahrscheinlichkeiten der künftigen Umweltzustände unbekannt sind (Ambiguität - Zwiespältigkeit). Anwendung findet die prospect theory (urspr. lottery theory) beispielsweise in der ökonomischen Entscheidungstheorie. Sie ist heute ein wesentlicher Bestandteil der Verhaltensökonomik (engl. Behavioural Economics)

Abgrenzung

Seit ca. 1940 gingen wirtschaftswissenschaftliche Theorien vorwiegend von einem rationalen Menschen aus, der seine Entscheidungen auf der Grundlage von Informationen so trifft, dass Kosten minimiert und der Nutzen für ihn maximiert wird (Homo oeconomicus). Der Economist verwendet die Metapher des „Mr Spock“ (Raumschiff Enterprise) als absolut logisch denkenden Akteur. Statistische Untersuchungen belegen diese Betrachtung in einigen Bereichen, während andere sich der Erklärung entziehen.

Die Prospect Theory ersetzt dieses strikt rationale Modell durch ein Modell, in dem die Rationalität unter anderem durch Kognitive Verzerrungen (s.u.) modifiziert wird
. Gegenüber anderen Modellen der Verhaltensökonomik hat es den Vorteil, dass man dieses Verhalten mathematisch modellieren kann.



Das mathematische Modell

Von der Empirie ausgehend, beschreibt die Theorie, wie Individuen erwartete Gewinne bzw. Verluste bewerten. Entscheidungsprozesse werden in zwei Stufen gegliedert: editing (etwa: Bearbeitung) und evaluation (Bewertung). Zunächst werden die möglichen Resultate heuristisch geordnet: Ähnlichkeiten und Referenzpunkte werden festgelegt, so dass niedrige Ergebnisse als Verluste, höhere als Gewinne angesehen werden. Danach werden, ausgehend von den potentiellen Resultaten und ihren Eintrittswahrscheinlichkeiten, diesen Punkten Werte (Nutzen) zugeordnet. Die Alternative mit dem höchsten Nutzen wird dann gewählt.

Die einfachste Form der Formel, die Kahneman und Tversky für die Bewertungsphase angeben lautet

U=w(p_1)v(x_1)+w(p_2)v(x_2)+\dots,
wobei
x_1,x_2,\dots
die potentiellen Resultate und
p_1,p_2,\dots





ihre jeweiligen Eintrittswahrscheinlichkeiten abbilden.
v ist eine so genannte Wertfunktion , die einem Resultat einen Wert bzw. Nutzen zuordnet. Sie schneidet den Referenzpunkt (0;0), ist S-förmig und gewichtet, wie ihre Asymmetrie nahelegt, bei gleicher Varianz in absoluten Werten, Verluste stärker als Gewinne (loss aversion). Im Gegensatz zur Erweiterten Nutzentheorie werden nur Verluste und Gewinne, nicht aber absolute Beträge gemessen. Die Funktion w wird Wahrscheinlichkeits-Gewichtungsfunktion genannt und drückt aus, dass Individuen unwahrscheinliche Ergebnisse überbewerten und mittel- bis hochwahrscheinliche Ergebnisse unterbewerten.

Erklärungsversuch: Kognitive Verzerrungen

In der Theorie wird die These vertreten, dass häufig auftretende kognitive Verzerrungen (biases) das Verhalten unter Unsicherheit beeinflussen. Insbesondere sollen Menschen stärker durch Verluste als durch Gewinne motiviert werden und demnach mehr Energie in die Vermeidung von Verlusten als in die Erzielung von Gewinnen investieren.

Die Theorie basiert auf den experimentellen Arbeiten von Kahneman und Tversky
. Kahneman wurde 2002 mit dem Nobelpreis für Wirtschaftswissenschaften ausgezeichnet, Tversky war zu diesem Zeitpunkt schon verstorben. Sie deckten in ihren psychologischen Experimenten die folgenden Wahrnehmungsverzerrungen und Ursachen auf:

* Vermessenheitsverzerrung (overconfidence/over-confidentiality bias) verursacht durch
o Überschätzen der eigenen Fähigkeiten und des Mutes
o Überschätzen des eigenen Einflusses auf die Zukunft. Sogar phantastische Vorstellungen über zukünftige Ereignisse werden für wirksam gehalten (beispielsweise das Tragen des Vereins-T-Shirts vor wichtigen Spielen, Aberglaube)
o Fehleinschätzung der Fähigkeiten von Konkurrenten
o Überschätzen der eigenen Kenntnisse und des Verständnisses[2]

* Die Ankerheuristik (anchoring effect)
o Eine einmal gemachte Aussage (Meinung) wird zur selbsterfüllenden Prophezeiung. Dies gilt sogar dann, wenn eine Aussage von einer Quelle stammt, die nicht besser informiert ist als man selbst.[2]

* Sturheit
o Eine einmal eingenommene Position wird nicht gerne aufgegeben.

* Nähe-Verzerrung
o Die Kenntnis einer bestimmten Problematik verzerrt die Wahrnehmung in Richtung des Bekannten; anderweitige Optionen werden ignoriert.

* Status-quo-Verzerrung (status quo bias)
o Menschen gehen größere Risiken ein, um den Status quo zu erhalten, als um die Situation zu ändern.[2]

* Gewinn und Verlust
o Menschen fürchten Verlust mehr, als sie Gewinn begrüßen. Das geht so weit, dass greifbare Vorteile nicht wahrgenommen werden, um die entferntere Chance des Versagens zu vermeiden.[2]

* Falsche Prioritäten
o Menschen wenden unverhältnismäßig viel Zeit für kleine und unverhältnismäßig wenig für große Entscheidungen auf.

* Unangebrachtes Bedauern
o Bedauern über einen Verlust bringt nichts ein, aber es wird viel Zeit darauf verwendet.

* Täuschung
o Falsche Entscheidungen werden gerne schöngeredet. (Sturheit, s.a. Dissonanzauflösung)

* Manipulation
o Entscheidung für eine Sache fällt - bei gleichem Ergebnis - leichter, wenn sie mit Verlustangst präsentiert wird, und fällt schwerer bei Hoffnung auf Gewinn. (Gewinn- und Verlustszenarien)

* Priming (John A. Bargh)
o Entscheidungen werden durch vergangene, gespeicherte und meist unbewusste Erfahrungen und Erwartungen beeinflusst. (Semantisches Priming)

* Vorahnungen
o Entscheidungen werden durch die Fähigkeit, die Zukunft zu erahnen, beeinflusst. (Situationsbewusstsein)
[/img]
Valley84
Gesperrter User
Benutzer-Profile anzeigen


Anmeldungsdatum: 05.09.2011
Beiträge: 34

BeitragVerfasst am: 09 Sep 2011 - 21:09:09    Titel:

Auwei, da würde sich aber Daddy Freud freuen, wenn einer seiner Jünger einen "Nobelpreis" erhält! - Wäre fast dazu geneigt zu sagen: was für eine Blamage für die Wissenschaft!...aber es ist ja nur bei den Wiwis. Das sind dann die weischgespülten und verwässerten "Nobel"preise für "herausragende Denker" (Hust, hust!!) mit Sonderbeschichtung! Laughing
Sarafina91
Newbie
Benutzer-Profile anzeigen
Newbie


Anmeldungsdatum: 13.09.2011
Beiträge: 1

BeitragVerfasst am: 13 Sep 2011 - 19:57:52    Titel:

Da du offensichtlich nicht wirklich weißt worum es in diesem Studium überhaupt geht solltest du dich mal ein bisschen einlesen!

Zum Beispiel unter diesem Link:
Biologische Psychologie 2
http://dokumente-online.com/biologische-psychologie-2-zusammenfassung.html

Und das ist nur ein bruchteil dessen was die Psychologie überhaupt ausmacht!

Ich verbleibe in der Hoffnung dass du eines besseren belehrt wirst!

(PS: an alle anderen da draußen: Diesen Link kann ich nur wärmstens empfehlen, er hilft wirklich beim Lernen für die Biologische Psychologie!)
D. Ariely
Full Member
Benutzer-Profile anzeigen
Full Member


Anmeldungsdatum: 13.08.2011
Beiträge: 176

BeitragVerfasst am: 13 Sep 2011 - 20:15:28    Titel:

Hier noch etwas zu Kahnemann

Zitat:


Strategie: Entscheiden ohne Wahrnehmungsverzerrung

2. September 2011

Wahrnehmungsverzerrungen führen oft dazu, dass die falschen Entscheidungen getroffen werden. So besagt die Affektheuristik z.B., dass wir zu sehr am schönen Status quo hängen, obwohl dieser in Zukunft keine Gewinne mehr abwirft. Oder die Verlustaversion rät uns zu konservativen Entscheidungen, mit denen wir zwar keine Risiken eingehen, uns aber um den Erfolg bringen.

Daniel Kahneman, Dan Lovallo und Olivier Sibony haben daher in der aktuellen Ausgabe des Harvard Businessmanager eine Checkliste zusammengestellt (S. 22-29), wie sich diese Wahrnehmungszerrungen vermeiden lassen. Diese Checkliste umfasst 12 Aktionen. Im Originalbeitrag werden diese Aktionen als Fragen formuliert und mit konkreten Fallbeispielen zu einer Preissenkungs-, Investitions- und Akquisitionsentscheidung illustriert.

Hier sollen die Aktionen in ihrer grundlegenden psychologischen Wirkrichtung kurz angerissen werden. Sie können von einer Führungskraft eingesetzt werden, die eine Entscheidungsvorlage ihres Arbeitsteams bewerten will.

Die Checkliste

1. Überprüfen, ob es Eigeninteressen der Teammitglieder und übertriebenen Optimismus gibt. Hier geht es darum, Selbsttäuschungen aufzudecken, bei der Personen ihren eigenen Wunsch nachträglich rationalisieren.

2. Feststellen, ob sich das Team in den eigenen Vorschlag „verliebt“ hat. Hiermit soll die Affektheuristik umgangen werden. Diese besagt, dass man leicht die Risiken dafür unterschätzt, woran man besonders hängt.

3. Die Meinungsvielfalt und besonders abweichende Meinungen im Team ausloten. Normalerweise gibt es immer abweichende Meinungen. Wenn das nicht der Fall ist, könnte das auf Gruppendruck hindeuten oder auf ein kreativitätsfeindliches Klima, das keine intensive Diskussion unterschiedlicher Perspektiven zulässt.

4. Prüfen, ob die Analogien richtig oder falsch sind, mit der die Entscheidung begründet wird. Damit soll der Salienzbias ausgehebelt werden. Er führt dazu, dass man sich häufig an sehr eindrücklichen Ereignissen orientiert („Wir waren mit Produkt X sehr erfolgreich, also müssen wir vor allem dieses weiterentwickeln.“). Diese hervorstechenden Erfahrungen können dazu führen, dass man falsche Vorhersagen trifft.

5. Das Team auffordern, weitere überzeugende Alternativen zu entwickeln. Häufig wird beim Problemlösen nur eine einzige plausible Hypothese aufgestellt. Dann sammelt man nur noch Belege, um sie zu bestätigen. Die Suche nach Alternativen soll weitere Szenarien liefern und auch Informationen, die gegen bestimmte Annahmen sprechen.

6. Überlegen, ob man in einem Jahr noch genauso entscheiden würde. Damit sollen fehlende Informationen aufgespürt werden, die bei einer intuitiven Entscheidung oft unbewusst unterschlagen werden. Mit der Ein-Jahres-Perspektive rollte man den Fall vom Ergebnis her auf und kommt leichter darauf, welche Informationslücken derzeit noch bestehen.

7. Genau überprüfen, woher die Zahlen stammen, die als Entscheidungsgrundlage dienen. Damit soll der Ankerheuristik entgegengewirkt werden, die besagt, dass eine erste zufällige oder vergangenheitsbasierte (falsche) Zahlenschätzung zum verbindlichen Referenzwert für alle weiteren Schätzungen und damit zum Anker wird. Mit der Zahlenüberprüfung wird herausgefunden, ob es diesen Zahlenanker gibt und ob er zuverlässig ist.

8. Feststellen, ob es einen Halo-Effekt gibt. Ein Halo-Effekt liegt vor, wenn besonders positive Eigenschaften eines Unternehmens alle seine weiteren Aktionen in einem übermäßig günstigen Licht erscheinen lassen. „Wir machen es so, wie es das erfolgreiche Unternehmen X gemacht hat“ – könnte sich damit als Trugschluss erweisen, weil man so dem glänzenden Halo-Lichthof und nicht den konkreten Unternehmenspraktiken folgt.

9. Checken, ob sich das Team zu sehr an früher orientiert. Damit soll dem Irrtum der irreversiblen Kosten (Sunk-Cost Effect) begegnet werden. Der Irrtum besagt, dass man zu sehr an vergangenen Ausgaben hängt und gewillt ist, diese zu bereinigen, obwohl sie bereits unwiderruflich getätigt sind. Das kann dazu führen, dass man besonders in jene Produktsparte investiert, die finanziell angeschlagen ist. Stattdessen sollte man sich fragen, ob die Investition zukünftige Gewinne verspricht.

10. Abwägen, ob das Szenario zu optimistisch ist. Damit soll folgenden Optimismus-Illusionen entgegengewirkt werden: Selbstüberschätzung („Wir schaffen das.“), Planbarkeitsillusion („Wir können alle Hürden vorhersehen und haben alles im Griff.“) und das Ausblenden der Konkurrenz.

11. Ist das Negativszenario schlimm genug (S. 29)? Meistens ist der sogenannte Worst Case nicht schlimm genug. Mit einem Trick kann man aber dafür sorgen, dass er es wird. Man stellt sich vor, dass der schlimmste anzunehmende Fall bereits eingetreten ist und entwickelt eine Geschichte mit den Gründen, die dazu führten. Damit lässt sich ein genauerer Worst Case konstruieren.

12. Einschätzen, ob das Team zu vorsichtig ist. Hiermit wird die Verlustaversion angegangen. Verlustängste blockieren Entscheidungen, die ein gewisses Risiko bergen, aber eigentlich erfolgsversprechend sind.

www.wirtschaftspsychologie-aktuell.de





http://www.wirtschaftspsychologie-aktuell.de/strategie/strategie-20110902-daniel-kahneman-entscheiden-ohne-wahrnehmungsverzerrung.html


Aktuelle Ausgabe Sept. 2011 des Harvard Business Magazine


Zitat:

Daniel Kahneman, Dan Lovallo & Olivier Sibony (2011). Checkliste für Entscheider. Harvard Businessmanager, September 2011, 19-31. Hier kann man das Heft "Besser entscheiden: Was Nobelpreisträger Daniel Kahneman Managern rät"




[/img]
D. Ariely
Full Member
Benutzer-Profile anzeigen
Full Member


Anmeldungsdatum: 13.08.2011
Beiträge: 176

BeitragVerfasst am: 23 Sep 2011 - 18:41:59    Titel:


NEW BOOK: Thinking, Fast and Slow by Daniel Kahnemann (to be released in October 2011)




Zitat:


Review

“For anyone interested in economics, cognitive science, psychology, and, in short, human behavior, this is the book of the year. Before Malcolm Gladwell and Freakonomics, there was Daniel Kahneman who invented the field of behavior economics, won a Nobel…and now explains how we think and make choices. Here’s an easy choice: read this.” —The Daily Beast

“This book is one of the few that must be counted as mandatory reading for anyone interested in the Internet, even though it doesn’t claim to be about that. Before computer networking got cheap and ubiquitous, the sheer inefficiency of communication dampened the effects of the quirks of human psychology on macro scale events. No more. We must now confront how we really are in order to make sense of our world and not screw it up. Daniel Kahneman has discovered a path to make it possible.” —Jaron Lanier, author of You Are Not a Gadget

“Daniel Kahneman is one of the most original and interesting thinkers of our time. There may be no other person on the planet who better understands how and why we make the choices we make. In this absolutely amazing book, he shares a lifetime’s worth of wisdom presented in a manner that is simple and engaging, but nonetheless stunningly profound. This book is a must read for anyone with a curious mind.” —Steven D. Levitt, William B. Ogden Distinguished Service Professor of Economics at the University of Chicago

“Thinking, Fast and Slow is a masterpiece—a brilliant and engaging intellectual saga by one of the greatest psychologists and deepest thinkers of our time.
Kahneman should be parking a Pulitzer next to his Nobel Prize.” —Daniel Gilbert, Harvard University Professor of Psychology, author of Stumbling on Happiness, host of the award-winning PBS television series “This Emotional Life”

“This book is a tour de force by an intellectual giant; it is readable, wise, and deep. Buy it fast. Read it slowly and repeatedly. It will change the way you think, on the job, about the world, and in your own life.” —Richard Thaler, University of Chicago Professor of Economics and co-author of Nudge

“This is a landmark book in social thought, in the same league as The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith and The Interpretation of Dreams by Sigmund Freud.”—Nassim Taleb, author of The Black Swan

Daniel Kahneman is among the most influential psychologists in history and certainly the most important psychologist alive today. He has a gift for uncovering remarkable features of the human mind, many of which have become textbook classics and part of the conventional wisdom. His work has reshaped social psychology, cognitive science, the study of reason and of happiness, and behavioral economics, a field that he and his collaborator Amos Tversky helped to launch. The appearance of Thinking, Fast and Slow is a major event.” —Steven Pinker, Harvard College Professor of Psychology, Harvard University, and author of How the Mind Works and The Better Angels of our Nature

Product Description

Daniel Kahneman, recipient of the Nobel Prize in Economic Sciences for his seminal work in psychology that challenged the rational model of judgment and decision making, is one of our most important thinkers. His ideas have had a profound and widely regarded impact on many fields—including business, medicine, and politics—but until now, he has never brought together his many years of research and thinking in one book.

In the highly anticipated Thinking, Fast and Slow, Kahneman takes us on a groundbreaking tour of the mind and explains the two systems that drive the way we think and make choices. System 1 is fast, intuitive, and emotional; System 2 is slower, more deliberative, and more logical. Kahneman exposes the extraordinary capabilities—and also the faults and biases—of fast thinking, and reveals the pervasive influence of intuitive impressions on our thoughts and behavior. The importance of properly framing risks at work and at home, the effects of cognitive biases on how we view others, the difference between our experiencing and remembering selves and its impact on happiness, the role of loss aversion in playing the stock market—each of these can be understood only by knowing how the two systems work together to shape our judgments and decisions.

Engaging the reader in a lively conversation about how we think, Kahneman reveals where we can and cannot trust our intuitions and how we can tap into the benefits of slow thinking. He offers practical and enlightening insights into how choices are made in both our business and our personal lives—and how we can use different techniques to guard against the mental glitches that often get us into trouble. Thinking, Fast and Slow will transform the way you think about thinking.
quatsch
Moderator
Benutzer-Profile anzeigen
Moderator


Anmeldungsdatum: 31.08.2005
Beiträge: 3459

BeitragVerfasst am: 23 Sep 2011 - 21:14:36    Titel:

Die Nobelpreisträger sind auch nicht mehr, was sie mal waren, wenn sie jetzt schon in Internetforen werben (lassen) müssen...
D. Ariely
Full Member
Benutzer-Profile anzeigen
Full Member


Anmeldungsdatum: 13.08.2011
Beiträge: 176

BeitragVerfasst am: 24 Sep 2011 - 10:07:22    Titel:

quatsch hat folgendes geschrieben:
Die Nobelpreisträger sind auch nicht mehr, was sie mal waren, wenn sie jetzt schon in Internetforen werben (lassen) müssen...


Sag mal geht´s noch? Shocked Werben (lassen) müssen...., BITTE???
Hier wirbt niemand für jemanden; studiere ab Oktober selbst Psychologie und beschäftige mich aber schon seit der 10. Klasse mit diesen Themen.
Ich denke, daß es durchaus legitim ist einen Denker, einem hervoragenden PSYCHOLOGEN und brillianten FORSCHER wie D. Kahnemann einen eigenen Thread in einen PSYCHOLOGIE Forum zu widmen.
Und wenn er Dir nicht zusagt, dann brauchst du hier kein Gift zu injizieren. Das ist wirklich nicht angebracht und völlig unnötig!
Valley84
Gesperrter User
Benutzer-Profile anzeigen


Anmeldungsdatum: 05.09.2011
Beiträge: 34

BeitragVerfasst am: 24 Sep 2011 - 14:29:32    Titel:

D. Ariely hat folgendes geschrieben:
quatsch hat folgendes geschrieben:
Die Nobelpreisträger sind auch nicht mehr, was sie mal waren, wenn sie jetzt schon in Internetforen werben (lassen) müssen...


Sag mal geht´s noch? Shocked Werben (lassen) müssen...., BITTE???
Hier wirbt niemand für jemanden; studiere ab Oktober selbst Psychologie und beschäftige mich aber schon seit der 10. Klasse mit diesen Themen.
Ich denke, daß es durchaus legitim ist einen Denker, einem hervoragenden PSYCHOLOGEN und brillianten FORSCHER wie D. Kahnemann einen eigenen Thread in einen PSYCHOLOGIE Forum zu widmen.
Und wenn er Dir nicht zusagt, dann brauchst du hier kein Gift zu injizieren. Das ist wirklich nicht angebracht und völlig unnötig!


Psychologie als Wissenschaft zu bezeichnen, läßt schon wirklich tief blicken. Aber das beanstande ich hier nicht zum ersten Mal. Und nur weil der Psycho-Depp einen Wiwi-"Nobelpreis" erhalten hat, macht es ihn noch lange nicht zum "brillianten Forscher" und Denker, wie du hier behauptest.
Jeder Physiker (= die wahren Wissenschaftler) lacht sich tot und dämlich über Psychologen, Wirtschafts"wissenschaftler" und das ganze andere Möchte-Gern Gesocks!
Beiträge der letzten Zeit anzeigen:   
Foren-Übersicht -> Psychologie-Forum -> Daniel Kahnemann - Psychologe und Nobelpreisträger
Neues Thema eröffnen   Neue Antwort erstellen Alle Zeiten sind GMT + 1 Stunde
Gehe zu Seite 1, 2  Weiter
Seite 1 von 2

 
Gehe zu:  
Du kannst keine Beiträge in dieses Forum schreiben.
Du kannst auf Beiträge in diesem Forum nicht antworten.
Du kannst deine Beiträge in diesem Forum nicht bearbeiten.
Du kannst deine Beiträge in diesem Forum nicht löschen.
Du kannst an Umfragen in diesem Forum nicht mitmachen.

Chat :: Nachrichten:: Lexikon :: Bücher :: Impressum